Geothermal Heat Pumps

Many people today are hearing about the huge savings of switching to geothermal heat pumps for their heating and cooling needs.

The good news is.....it's true.

So whether you are....

...a beginner looking for information,

...a contractor trying to find installation details,

...an engineer looking for rules of thumb data and calculations,

...or just anybody trying to find information for geothermal,

you've found the right spot.


Before continuing, check out this great beginner's video:

For the beginner...

Many people understand how geothermal energy can heat your home. After all when we think of geothermal energy, what comes to mind?

Hot geysers like Old Faithful?

Hot springs?

Geothermal energy is manifested in these geological features that produce hot results. So it's a no brainer how geothermal energy is used to heat our homes.

But what about cooling?

Also,where should geothermal be used?

Why use geothermal?

These questions and more are answered in geothermal heating and cooling.

Beyond the Basics...

Of course, everybody wants to know:

How much money does it really save?

Generally speaking, compared to a conventional method of heating and cooling, most installations end up saving the consumer anywhere from 55 - 75% from their current heating and cooling bills.

Smaller homes can typically range from $1000-$2000 per year in heating and cooling costs. So the savings could be in the hundreds or lower thousand range.

However, if we start thinking about larger homes that could be spending upwards of $4000 - $6000 per year, the saving becomes very substantial.

And when we think of commercial and industrial establishments....the cost savings is massive (thousands upon thousands!)

So why doesn't everybody have geothermal, you may ask?

Installation cost!

Depending upon the type of installation done, where the installation is performed, and how well it is designed and installed truly determines the success of geothermal for your needs.

Where to Start?

Okay, so I probably have your attention due to the amazing cost savings that you could experience with geothermal.

Where do I start you may ask?

First be an informed consumer.

Or if you are a contractor, engineer, or an expert in this area continuing education is very important.

We need to learn which geothermal system is best for your application and locality. The page link here will give you an overview of the many systems available, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each.

As I mentioned earlier, the installation type and quality is very crucial to the success of your system.

The geothermal installation web page gives an installation guide and design rules of thumb for each type of system.

Unless you are brave and adventurous, I would not recommend a geothermal project as a "do-it-yourself" project.

Even if you are brave and adventurous, I would not recommend it.

The installation is very crucial. So only a contractor with equipment, experience, and design capability should be used for the installation.

I am currently working on interviewing and selecting only the best contractors available so stay tuned for recommendations in your area.

When it comes available it will be posted on the "geothermal heat pump installation" page above.

Geothermal Companies

There are many geothermal companies (link coming soon!) around that make very efficient heat pumps. Only a heat pump that is specifically design for geothermal applications should be used. A standard air source heat pump cannot be used. Be aware that many companies refer to their geothermal heat pumps as water source heat pumps.

One such water source heat pump available is the Trane geothermal heat pump.

Also, check out these great Youtube.com videos for geothermal heat pumps.


Share your Geothermal Heat Pump Story With Us!

How much money did geothermal save you or someone that you know? Please share with us what you know!

What Other Visitors Have Said

Click below to see contributions from other visitors to this page...

Bosch Geothermal cycle time 
In 2012 I had a Bosch TA closed loop system installed and It runs for an hour and a half to heat the home to 73 degrees in winter. Its only off for about …

Click here to write your own.


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